Fruit Of The Loin
Zeitgeist Spontaneity Follow Mobile Ask Fan Mail
theatlantic:

Study Theology, Even If You Don’t Believe in God

This lost liberal art encourages scholars to understand history from the inside out.
Read more. [Image: The National Library of the Netherlands]


Having my Bachelor’s degree in Religion makes me consistently excited to read articles like this one here, but I should have recognized the author of this particular piece was talking about theology, which is more of a divinity school thing than it is a liberal art. That being said, this article starts off haphazardly but ends up right where it needs to be. Theology (ugh, do we have to call it that?) is important, and here’s why according to Tara Isabella Burton:A good theologian, [Oxford’s Dr. William Wood, a University Lecturer in Philosophical Theology and my former tutor,] says, “has to be a historian, a philosopher, a linguist, a skillful interpreter of texts both ancient and modern, and probably many other things besides.” In many ways, a course in theology is an ideal synthesis of all other liberal arts: no longer, perhaps, “Queen of the Sciences,” but at least, as Wood terms it, “Queen of the Humanities.”Yet, for me, the value of theology lies not merely in the breadth of skills it taught, but in the opportunity it presented to explore a given historical mindset in greater depth. I learned to read the Bible in both Greek and Hebrew, to analyze the minutiae of language that allows us to distinguish “person” from “nature,” “substance” from “essence.” I read “orthodox” and “heretical” accounts alike of the nature of the Godhead, and learned about the convoluted and often arbitrary historical processes that delineated the two.Such precision may seem—to the religious person and agnostic alike—no more useful than counting the number of angels on the head of a pin. But for me, it allowed me access into the fundamental building blocks of the mentality, say, of a 12th-century French monk, or a mystic from besieged Byzantium. While the study of history taught me the story of humanity on a broader scale, the study of theology allowed me insight into the minds and hearts, fears and concerns, of those in circumstances were so wildly different from my own… To study theology well requires not faith, but empathy.If history and comparative religion alike offer us perspective on world events from the “outside,” the study of theology offers us a chance to study those same events “from within”: an opportunity to get inside the heads of those whose beliefs and choices shaped so much of our history, and who—in the world outside the ivory tower—still shape plenty of the world today.Stick with this article toward the end. I promise it’s worth it.

theatlantic:

Study Theology, Even If You Don’t Believe in God

This lost liberal art encourages scholars to understand history from the inside out.

Read more. [Image: The National Library of the Netherlands]

Having my Bachelor’s degree in Religion makes me consistently excited to read articles like this one here, but I should have recognized the author of this particular piece was talking about theology, which is more of a divinity school thing than it is a liberal art. That being said, this article starts off haphazardly but ends up right where it needs to be. Theology (ugh, do we have to call it that?) is important, and here’s why according to Tara Isabella Burton:

A good theologian, [Oxford’s Dr. William Wood, a University Lecturer in Philosophical Theology and my former tutor,] says, “has to be a historian, a philosopher, a linguist, a skillful interpreter of texts both ancient and modern, and probably many other things besides.” In many ways, a course in theology is an ideal synthesis of all other liberal arts: no longer, perhaps, “Queen of the Sciences,” but at least, as Wood terms it, “Queen of the Humanities.”

Yet, for me, the value of theology lies not merely in the breadth of skills it taught, but in the opportunity it presented to explore a given historical mindset in greater depth. I learned to read the Bible in both Greek and Hebrew, to analyze the minutiae of language that allows us to distinguish “person” from “nature,” “substance” from “essence.” I read “orthodox” and “heretical” accounts alike of the nature of the Godhead, and learned about the convoluted and often arbitrary historical processes that delineated the two.

Such precision may seem—to the religious person and agnostic alike—no more useful than counting the number of angels on the head of a pin. But for me, it allowed me access into the fundamental building blocks of the mentality, say, of a 12th-century French monk, or a mystic from besieged Byzantium. While the study of history taught me the story of humanity on a broader scale, the study of theology allowed me insight into the minds and hearts, fears and concerns, of those in circumstances were so wildly different from my own… To study theology well requires not faith, but empathy.

If history and comparative religion alike offer us perspective on world events from the “outside,” the study of theology offers us a chance to study those same events “from within”: an opportunity to get inside the heads of those whose beliefs and choices shaped so much of our history, and who—in the world outside the ivory tower—still shape plenty of the world today.

Stick with this article toward the end. I promise it’s worth it.

quoteThe macho pose, the loud talking, the insistence on violence as resolution, the boastfulness, marks the formative portion of my life. The men who participated in this behavior were no more sexist then the men I know now. But they lacked power. And they came from generations of men who lacked power. And they came up in society that claimed such power as the essence of manhood.quote - Ta-Nehisi Coates, on manhood. (via theatlantic)

theatlantic:

Starbucks Thinks It Can Stop the Fiscal Cliff with These ‘Come Together’ Cups

Is this actually happening? 

[Image: AP]

I’m just reblogging these photos because the image on top is from San Antonio! At least according to the Salt Lake Tribune which offers this caption:

In this Feb. 14, 2010 photo, a sign outside a Starbucks hangs over the Riverwalk with the Navarro Street bridge in the background in San Antonio, Texas. Starbucks plans to begin paying a 10-cents-per-share cash dividend to investors.(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

BAM! San Antumblrans, you can thank me later for this investigative work*.

* Honestly, it took me all of two minutes to research it on tineye.com.

theatlantic:

Kenyan Trial Asks, Can Journalism Be a War Crime?

Radio journalist Joshua arap Sang is accused of inciting mass violence in 2007. His case raises complex questions, rooted in Nuremberg and Rwanda, about the capabilities and responsibilities of speech.

Read more at The Atlantic
[Image: Robert Corey-Boulet]

Fascinating concept.

theatlantic:

Kenyan Trial Asks, Can Journalism Be a War Crime?

Radio journalist Joshua arap Sang is accused of inciting mass violence in 2007. His case raises complex questions, rooted in Nuremberg and Rwanda, about the capabilities and responsibilities of speech.

Read more at The Atlantic

[Image: Robert Corey-Boulet]

Fascinating concept.

theatlantic:

Finally, an Art Form that Gets the Internet: Opera

Brian, 16, is instant-messaging. He’s chatting with a girl he’s never met in person—a girl who, by the looks of her avatar, seems both his age and more beautiful than any girl who’s ever deigned to talk to him. And she just asked to take the chat private.

Sitting at his laptop, in his room, Brian pauses for a moment; his mouth hangs between a smile and an inhaled breath. He gets up, hurries to the door, makes sure his parents aren’t on the other side. He locks it. He hustles around his room again, around his bed and back to his computer—I can see the disbelief, awe, anxiety on his face—and sits back down at the computer. They’re in a private chat room now, this girl and him.

He faces the laptop. On his screen, words appear from the girl: “What’s going on?”

The words appear on a tower as tall as a house behind Brian’s head. Hazy music wafts around him, music over which the girl—her name’s Rebecca—sings: “What’s going on?” The music swirls again.

Thousands of us are watching him, watching him respond, seeing what he’ll do next.

Read more. [Image: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera]


I didn’t finish reading this review, but it sounds like the perfect gateway into opera for any millennial. I’m reblogging this post in order to archive this opera.

theatlantic:

Finally, an Art Form that Gets the Internet: Opera

Brian, 16, is instant-messaging. He’s chatting with a girl he’s never met in person—a girl who, by the looks of her avatar, seems both his age and more beautiful than any girl who’s ever deigned to talk to him. And she just asked to take the chat private.

Sitting at his laptop, in his room, Brian pauses for a moment; his mouth hangs between a smile and an inhaled breath. He gets up, hurries to the door, makes sure his parents aren’t on the other side. He locks it. He hustles around his room again, around his bed and back to his computer—I can see the disbelief, awe, anxiety on his face—and sits back down at the computer. They’re in a private chat room now, this girl and him.

He faces the laptop. On his screen, words appear from the girl: “What’s going on?”

The words appear on a tower as tall as a house behind Brian’s head. Hazy music wafts around him, music over which the girl—her name’s Rebecca—sings: “What’s going on?” The music swirls again.

Thousands of us are watching him, watching him respond, seeing what he’ll do next.

Read more. [Image: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera]

I didn’t finish reading this review, but it sounds like the perfect gateway into opera for any millennial. I’m reblogging this post in order to archive this opera.

cheatsheet:

Chick-Lit Remix: The simple brilliance of gender-flipping 

This article is especially good at combing through all the internet memes to find a very niche movement that aims to flip the genders of several forms of media. Folks out there take the time to flip news headlines, comic books, video games, billboards, etc., not to mention book covers. Who knew!

cheatsheet:

Chick-Lit Remix: The simple brilliance of gender-flipping 

This article is especially good at combing through all the internet memes to find a very niche movement that aims to flip the genders of several forms of media. Folks out there take the time to flip news headlines, comic books, video games, billboards, etc., not to mention book covers. Who knew!

Can San Antonio Displace Austin as Texas’s Tech Hub?I feel like saying the city has “quietly been establishing itself as a center for computer industries” sounds underhanded & malevolent. Like, no, San Antonio has been doing its own thang for years, folks. And so many Austin defenders among The Atlantic commentor community! Can’t San Antonio get a little love too?

Can San Antonio Displace Austin as Texas’s Tech Hub?

I feel like saying the city has “quietly been establishing itself as a center for computer industries” sounds underhanded & malevolent. Like, no, San Antonio has been doing its own thang for years, folks. And so many Austin defenders among The Atlantic commentor community! Can’t San Antonio get a little love too?

(Source : facebook.com)

I’ve had these two reblogged posts saved to my drafts section for quite some time now. For about several months, in fact! I just found it so funny that there are these correlations going on in San Francisco between drag queens, butterflies, gangsters, & cupcakes. I’m not going to post them after all. I’m just going to purge them from my list of drafts once & for all since, besides consecutively publishing these posts or combining them into a single screenshot, I can’t get the two posts to connect in any way. So, here you go!For the Lapham’s Quarterly post, visit this link.For the Atlantic post, visit this link.

I’ve had these two reblogged posts saved to my drafts section for quite some time now. For about several months, in fact! I just found it so funny that there are these correlations going on in San Francisco between drag queens, butterflies, gangsters, & cupcakes. I’m not going to post them after all. I’m just going to purge them from my list of drafts once & for all since, besides consecutively publishing these posts or combining them into a single screenshot, I can’t get the two posts to connect in any way. So, here you go!

For the Lapham’s Quarterly post, visit this link.
For the Atlantic post, visit this link.

Powered by Tumblr.