Fruit Of The Loin
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cordjefferson:

Nietzsche warns us that it’s painful to discover you’ve become the monster you thought you were battling. But what certainly hurts worse is when, having become a monster, the other monsters won’t even let you into their dark and secret hideouts. As wealthy and powerful as Simmons has become while playing by America’s rules, there are still golf clubs where he can’t be a member, and still prominent white politicians who wouldn’t think twice about calling him “brotha” or telling him “you be da man.” There are even still many people who would be upset if their daughter brought him home. There’s a notorious and easily modified black joke that goes, “What do you call a black billionaire (or lawyer or doctor)?” The answer: “A nigger.” That one’s always been particularly ugly to me for its honesty.

I wrote about all these feelings I’m having about Russell Simmons and Kanye West and Jay-Z being at Occupy Wall Street.

Oh, I enjoyed this stream of consciousness. What does society say to a black (or minority) millionaire? Can this revolution start with a wealthy individual, let alone a minority millionaire? I bet these questions don’t keep #OccupyWallStreet up at night, and that’s kind of a shame.

coketalk:

Maybe it’s my kink showing, but I’ve got a thing for those ziptie handcuffs that the police have been using throughout the occupation protests.
I’m fascinated by them, not just as objects, but as their potential to be a symbol. They are ‘single use only’ instruments of oppression — cheap, wasteful, and violent — and of course, they come in pink.
In a disposable plastic society, a pair of ziptie handcuffs couldn’t be a more fitting representation of the banality of evil, and if it were up to me, the wide-eyed shape of those loops of nylon would become an appropriated logo for everyone who’s fed up with living in a police state.

"Banality of evil" is kind of an important concept you should learn, followers.

coketalk:

Maybe it’s my kink showing, but I’ve got a thing for those ziptie handcuffs that the police have been using throughout the occupation protests.

I’m fascinated by them, not just as objects, but as their potential to be a symbol. They are ‘single use only’ instruments of oppression — cheap, wasteful, and violent — and of course, they come in pink.

In a disposable plastic society, a pair of ziptie handcuffs couldn’t be a more fitting representation of the banality of evil, and if it were up to me, the wide-eyed shape of those loops of nylon would become an appropriated logo for everyone who’s fed up with living in a police state.

"Banality of evil" is kind of an important concept you should learn, followers.

(Source : coketalk)

Have y’all seen this Daily Show video about #OccupyWallStreet? I’m not the biggest fan of the show, but Samantha Bee does some amazing reporting on the class divisions in Zuccotti Park—not to mention the hilarious irony at the very end of the segment.

My favorite part? The guy struggling to be so politically correct around 2:50. “Is there a course in condescension that everyone is taking here?”

motherjones:

Octopi Wall Street!
Matt Taibbi famously described Goldman Sachs  as “a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity,” but the first comparisons of moneyed interests to voracious tentacled creatures date back to the Gilded Age. A visual history of depicting corporate America as scary cephalopds.

And before I leave, here’s my other favorite Occupy Wall Street commentary.

motherjones:

Octopi Wall Street!

Matt Taibbi famously described Goldman Sachs as “a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity,” but the first comparisons of moneyed interests to voracious tentacled creatures date back to the Gilded Age. A visual history of depicting corporate America as scary cephalopds.

And before I leave, here’s my other favorite Occupy Wall Street commentary.

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