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theatlantic:

2014: The Year TV Starts Atoning for Its Lack of Diversity?

2013 was a great year for television. So great, in fact, that many critics’ best-of-the-year lists offered some especially enthusiastic and superlative praise. "One of the best years for TV in a long time," Time magazine noted. "One of the best years in TV history," the A.V. Club echoed a few weeks later.
But 2013’s stellar offerings didn’t come without their share of problems. Conversations about TV from the past calendar year raised questions about the character diversity and representations of minority groups. Why does Mindy Kaling only date white guys in The Mindy Project? Will Girls get over its race problem? Can Doctor Who overcome its disappointing whiteness and maleness? Given the success of Scandal and Grey’s Anatomy, why don’t more showrunners take cues from Shonda Rhimes and make diversity a priority? How can portrayals of bisexual people improve if television doesn’t even get female friendships right? Why is Orange Is the New Black the gold standard for TV diversity when even it could do so much better?
Read more. [Image: Sasheer Zamata; HBO; Netflix]


My favorite quotes:Some might minimize these complaints as the work of the PC police or rabid Tumblr social-justice warriors, but these questions matter. Seeing your lifestyle or identity represented on a television screen is validating, and it’s easy to take that validation for granted if you’re used to seeing people like you on every channel at every hour. When it doesn’t happen, the message is clear: You’re not important enough to have your stories told. Your identity—as a racial or ethnic minority, as a queer person, as a woman—isn’t important enough to bother with getting it right.And:Judy Berman wrote for The Atlantic that Girls was never going to get over its own race problem as long as [Lena] Dunham and company cast minority characters in roles that were completely defined by their race.Fin!

theatlantic:

2014: The Year TV Starts Atoning for Its Lack of Diversity?

2013 was a great year for television. So great, in fact, that many critics’ best-of-the-year lists offered some especially enthusiastic and superlative praise. "One of the best years for TV in a long time," Time magazine noted. "One of the best years in TV history," the A.V. Club echoed a few weeks later.

But 2013’s stellar offerings didn’t come without their share of problems. Conversations about TV from the past calendar year raised questions about the character diversity and representations of minority groups. Why does Mindy Kaling only date white guys in The Mindy Project? Will Girls get over its race problem? Can Doctor Who overcome its disappointing whiteness and maleness? Given the success of Scandal and Grey’s Anatomy, why don’t more showrunners take cues from Shonda Rhimes and make diversity a priority? How can portrayals of bisexual people improve if television doesn’t even get female friendships right? Why is Orange Is the New Black the gold standard for TV diversity when even it could do so much better?

Read more. [Image: Sasheer Zamata; HBO; Netflix]

My favorite quotes:

Some might minimize these complaints as the work of the PC police or rabid Tumblr social-justice warriors, but these questions matter. Seeing your lifestyle or identity represented on a television screen is validating, and it’s easy to take that validation for granted if you’re used to seeing people like you on every channel at every hour. When it doesn’t happen, the message is clear: You’re not important enough to have your stories told. Your identity—as a racial or ethnic minority, as a queer person, as a woman—isn’t important enough to bother with getting it right.

And:

Judy Berman wrote for The Atlantic that Girls was never going to get over its own race problem as long as [Lena] Dunham and company cast minority characters in roles that were completely defined by their race.

Fin!

capitalnewyork:


Another kind of “for white people” work is much easier to grasp. It conveys up front the notion that white people are a breed apart, morally, spiritually, intellectually. “Birth of a Nation,” “Gone with the Wind,” and “The Searchers,” yeah, sure, but also the first scene of the first episode of HBO’s “The Wire,” a moment that seemed so condescending to me that I could go no further with the series that virtually every white writer I know loves to pieces.
The opening of the series is a murder-scene conversation between a young hood-rat witness and a sage, world-weary white detective about the death of a lowlife named Snotboogie:
MCNULTY watches as the body, now bagged, is hauled into the back of the MORGUE WAGON.
MCNULTY: I got to ask you. If every time Snotboogie would grab the money and run away, why’d you even let him in the game?
WITNESS: What?
MCNULTY: If Snotboogie always stole the money, why’d you let him play?
WITNESS: You got to. This America, man.
The WITNESS looks away, oblivious to the poetry of it. MCNULTY turns around, takes in the scope of the tragedy that is Baltimore.
Yes, of course, the Witness wouldn’t grasp the poetry of his own words. Of course, this is McNulty’s moment to sigh deeply at the “tragedy that is Baltimore.” This America, man.
“Mad Men” doesn’t condescend in that way, but I still find it hard to relate to. Money and status seem to be on the line in nearly every encounter. That’s why one character, a formerly slim, icy and glamorous blond who has become plump and was rechristened by “Mad Men” fans on the internet as Fat Betty, is a tragicomic figure in this show’s universe.
The direction and music seemed designed to convey that nothing is sadder than being overweight and shoved to the margins of the rat race. Betty is living through the aftermath of a divorce and a cancer scare, sure, but the fact that she can’t suffer these misfortunes in style, like Jackie O strutting down Madison Avenue, compounds the tragedy. It made me think of John Cassavetes’ brutal kiss-off to middle-aged Gena Rowlands in “Opening Night”: “You’re not a woman to me anymore.” Fat Betty is the flipside of chubby, lonely but bubbly Queen Latifah staring down the abyss in the comedy Last Holiday.

Steven Boone on the very white poetry of “Mad Men”

Capital New York is one of the most underrated Tumblr blogs out there. I don’t get why you people don’t follow them already. Don’t. Get.It was like Kevin Lee, an Asian-American film critic and “Mad Men” expert who attended Keith [Uhlich]’s party, put it: “The genius of ‘whiteness’ is that its ethnic blankness allows viewers of most any background to project themselves onto it, provided there’s some attractive quality they find in it.”Read the rest! I promise it’s good.

capitalnewyork:

Another kind of “for white people” work is much easier to grasp. It conveys up front the notion that white people are a breed apart, morally, spiritually, intellectually. “Birth of a Nation,” “Gone with the Wind,” and “The Searchers,” yeah, sure, but also the first scene of the first episode of HBO’s “The Wire,” a moment that seemed so condescending to me that I could go no further with the series that virtually every white writer I know loves to pieces.

The opening of the series is a murder-scene conversation between a young hood-rat witness and a sage, world-weary white detective about the death of a lowlife named Snotboogie:

MCNULTY watches as the body, now bagged, is hauled into the back of the MORGUE WAGON.

MCNULTY: I got to ask you. If every time Snotboogie would grab the money and run away, why’d you even let him in the game?

WITNESS: What?

MCNULTY: If Snotboogie always stole the money, why’d you let him play?

WITNESS: You got to. This America, man.

The WITNESS looks away, oblivious to the poetry of it. MCNULTY turns around, takes in the scope of the tragedy that is Baltimore.

Yes, of course, the Witness wouldn’t grasp the poetry of his own words. Of course, this is McNulty’s moment to sigh deeply at the “tragedy that is Baltimore.” This America, man.

“Mad Men” doesn’t condescend in that way, but I still find it hard to relate to. Money and status seem to be on the line in nearly every encounter. That’s why one character, a formerly slim, icy and glamorous blond who has become plump and was rechristened by “Mad Men” fans on the internet as Fat Betty, is a tragicomic figure in this show’s universe.

The direction and music seemed designed to convey that nothing is sadder than being overweight and shoved to the margins of the rat race. Betty is living through the aftermath of a divorce and a cancer scare, sure, but the fact that she can’t suffer these misfortunes in style, like Jackie O strutting down Madison Avenue, compounds the tragedy. It made me think of John Cassavetes’ brutal kiss-off to middle-aged Gena Rowlands in “Opening Night”: “You’re not a woman to me anymore.” Fat Betty is the flipside of chubby, lonely but bubbly Queen Latifah staring down the abyss in the comedy Last Holiday.

Steven Boone on the very white poetry of “Mad Men”

Capital New York is one of the most underrated Tumblr blogs out there. I don’t get why you people don’t follow them already. Don’t. Get.

It was like Kevin Lee, an Asian-American film critic and “Mad Men” expert who attended Keith [Uhlich]’s party, put it: “The genius of ‘whiteness’ is that its ethnic blankness allows viewers of most any background to project themselves onto it, provided there’s some attractive quality they find in it.”

Read the rest! I promise it’s good.

So I just went through a very large portion of this blog’s archive, and I found maybe three guys who might have been an ethnic minority. Doubtful though!LOL Thanks for following me! (I must be in a mood today)

So I just went through a very large portion of this blog’s archive, and I found maybe three guys who might have been an ethnic minority. Doubtful though!

LOL Thanks for following me! (I must be in a mood today)

Ethnic makeup of San Antonio. “Makeup” — hah! Needs more cholabrow!(via downlo; Red = Caucasoid, Blue = African-American, Green = Asian, Orange = Latino)
Ethnic makeup of San Antonio. “Makeup” — hah! Needs more cholabrow!

(via downlo; Red = Caucasoid, Blue = African-American, Green = Asian, Orange = Latino)


Yikes.
We looked at 742 books reviewed, across all genres. Of those 742, 655 were written by Caucasian authors (1 transgender writer, 437 men, and 217 women). Thirty-one were written by Africans or African Americans (21 men, 10 women), 9 were written by Hispanic authors (8 men, 1 woman), 33 by Asian, Asian-American or South Asian writers (19 men, 14 women), 8 by Middle Eastern writers (5 men, 3 women) and 6 were books written by writers whose racial background we were simply unable to identify.


Reblogging because this gap is incredible.

Yikes.

We looked at 742 books reviewed, across all genres. Of those 742, 655 were written by Caucasian authors (1 transgender writer, 437 men, and 217 women). Thirty-one were written by Africans or African Americans (21 men, 10 women), 9 were written by Hispanic authors (8 men, 1 woman), 33 by Asian, Asian-American or South Asian writers (19 men, 14 women), 8 by Middle Eastern writers (5 men, 3 women) and 6 were books written by writers whose racial background we were simply unable to identify.

Reblogging because this gap is incredible.

(Source : capitalnewyork)

Some might say she’s a little “too ghetto” for their tastes (codeword for “ethnic”); others might suggest she’s “a little on the endowed side” (or “bootylicious,” if you will); others might still find judgment in her ensemble, her make-up, or, yes, even her very own hair. I believe Luzelena Ortiz-Lopez beautifully embodies what photographer Helen L. Montoya of the San Antonio Express-News captures in her slideshow, the Hottest Latina of 2011. You go on with your bad self, Luz!

Some might say she’s a little “too ghetto” for their tastes (codeword for “ethnic”); others might suggest she’s “a little on the endowed side” (or “bootylicious,” if you will); others might still find judgment in her ensemble, her make-up, or, yes, even her very own hair. I believe Luzelena Ortiz-Lopez beautifully embodies what photographer Helen L. Montoya of the San Antonio Express-News captures in her slideshow, the Hottest Latina of 2011. You go on with your bad self, Luz!

(Source : facebook.com)

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